August 3, 2013

(Source: vatandasinbiri, via sculllyy)

August 1, 2013

freyathealchemist:

it-always-gets-better-kid:

zuviosgemini:

banknote:

If you’re ever sad, just look at this photoset of humongous dogs.

I WANT A HUGE DOG SO FRICKN BAD

I need this in my life

I SHALL RIDE IT INTO BATTLE

(via abs0lutely-i-do)

August 1, 2013

(Source: hounddogsrunning)

July 31, 2013
thefrogman:

[imgur | video] [h/t: dpaf]

thefrogman:

[imgur | video] [h/t: dpaf]

(via fuckyeahloldemort)

July 13, 2013
dogjournal:

SCIENTIST DISCOVERS MUTANT GENE CAUSING ADVERSE REACTION BY CERTAIN DOG BREEDS TO DRUGS - “Mealey, a veterinarian and pharmacologist at WSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine, will receive a 2013 Women to Watch in Life Science Award for identifying why certain dog breeds suffer deadly drug reactions while others do just fine…”
Researcher Katrina Mealey of Washington State University has discovered that certain breeds in the herding group (Collies, Shelties, Australian Shepherds, etc.) are predisposed to having adverse reactions to certain drugs due to a gene mutation. Read more from WSU News:

In 2001, Mealey discovered a blip in a gene called MDR1 that predisposes herding dogs such as collies, shelties, Australian shepherds and Old English sheepdogs to react violently to a simple deworming pill. Until her discovery, veterinarians were aware that certain breeds – especially collies - were at risk for adverse reactions to the popular drug ivermectin that destroys heartworm, ear mites and numerous other parasites.

Not long after entering the market in the 1980s, ivermectin became known as a super-weapon drug that protects animals and humans alike. But in a sliver of the vast dog world, veterinarians observed that something was amiss. While ivermectin would cure a poodle, it could kill a collie.
 
Knowing this, “veterinarians followed the adage, ‘White feet, don’t treat,’ but no one knew the ‘why’ behind it,” said Mealey.  “A hereditary component was suspected and so veterinarians wondered if it applied to other breeds as well.”
 
And it did. Leading a group of WSU researchers, Mealey pinpointed the MDR1 gene and in 2001 published the findings in the journal Pharmacogenics. Since then, she has found 12 other breeds that can carry the faulty gene.

Thanks to Mealey’s discovery, precautions can be taken to protect dogs in the herding group from drugs that do not agree with their biology. Click here for the full story.  Also, click here for the list of dog breeds affected by the gene mutation.

dogjournal:

SCIENTIST DISCOVERS MUTANT GENE CAUSING ADVERSE REACTION BY CERTAIN DOG BREEDS TO DRUGS - Mealey, a veterinarian and pharmacologist at WSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine, will receive a 2013 Women to Watch in Life Science Award for identifying why certain dog breeds suffer deadly drug reactions while others do just fine…”

Researcher Katrina Mealey of Washington State University has discovered that certain breeds in the herding group (Collies, Shelties, Australian Shepherds, etc.) are predisposed to having adverse reactions to certain drugs due to a gene mutation. Read more from WSU News:

In 2001, Mealey discovered a blip in a gene called MDR1 that predisposes herding dogs such as collies, shelties, Australian shepherds and Old English sheepdogs to react violently to a simple deworming pill. Until her discovery, veterinarians were aware that certain breeds – especially collies - were at risk for adverse reactions to the popular drug ivermectin that destroys heartworm, ear mites and numerous other parasites.
Not long after entering the market in the 1980s, ivermectin became known as a super-weapon drug that protects animals and humans alike. But in a sliver of the vast dog world, veterinarians observed that something was amiss. While ivermectin would cure a poodle, it could kill a collie.
 
Knowing this, “veterinarians followed the adage, ‘White feet, don’t treat,’ but no one knew the ‘why’ behind it,” said Mealey.  “A hereditary component was suspected and so veterinarians wondered if it applied to other breeds as well.”
 
And it did. Leading a group of WSU researchers, Mealey pinpointed the MDR1 gene and in 2001 published the findings in the journal Pharmacogenics. Since then, she has found 12 other breeds that can carry the faulty gene.

Thanks to Mealey’s discovery, precautions can be taken to protect dogs in the herding group from drugs that do not agree with their biology. Click here for the full story.  Also, click here for the list of dog breeds affected by the gene mutation.

July 11, 2013

tastefullyoffensive:

Dogs Wearing Hats

Previously: Bearded Dragons Wearing Hats,Cats Wearing Ties

(via charlhynnxchaos)

July 10, 2013

Ahh, the migration of the rare golden retriever fish. What a rare and beautiful sight in nature.

Ahh, the migration of the rare golden retriever fish. What a rare and beautiful sight in nature.

(Source: thingssheloves, via sculllyy)

July 6, 2013

dogjournal:

"THE SILENCE OF DOGS IN CARS" - Shot over three years, Martin Usborne’s series consists of over forty images of dogs gazing silently through car windows, often in the dead of night.”

Photographer Martin Usborne’s photo series, “The Silence of Dogs in Cars,” focuses on various dogs sitting alone in cars. The photos are staged and these are not random dogs on the street. Usborne explores issues of isolation in an urban setting. Read more from Art Books Heidelberg:

The images, which are staged and highly cinematic, evoke a mood of loneliness and longing. They are not so much portraits of dogs as studies in separation: on one level referring to the separation between humans and (other) animals but on another the separation within ourselves, between our everyday selves and the rawer (more animal) parts that we keep locked away.

***

"The Silence of Dogs in Cars" has been shown in solo exhibitions in London and Los Angeles as well as on various art blogs and in magazines around the world, e. g. The New Yorker Photo Booth, Time Light Box, Burn Magazine, foto8, BBC Viewfinder, The Guardian, The Independent, British Journal of Photography, Das Magazin.

"The series is not about the issue of leaving dogs in hot cars, though Martin, a confirmed dog-lover…, is obviously aware of the animal welfare debate. These pictures stem from his childhood experience and then extend into the feeling of isolation many of us will experience, in this case in a modern urban setting."

These photos are amazing! Click here for more information about the series (Additional info and pictures from nydailynews.com). Also, click here to learn more about photographer Martin Usborne.

(via fuckyeahawesomedogs)

July 4, 2013

(Source: littlesouthernchick, via australiancattledogs)

June 27, 2013

mistercr0wley:

I’m moving and I need to rehome Shenzi. It pains me so bad to do so but when I got her, it was always my intention to rehome her when she was better trained. 

Shenzi is between 3-5 years old. She’s about 30lbs (maybe a little
more). She’s spayed, UTD on shots, dog friendly and she wont mess with a cat unless they give her reason to but her and my very dog friendly cat are very close. She’s crate trained and really enjoys her own space. She loves going on walks and she loves, loves, loves people. She goes and gets groomed once a month and is always one of the grooming staffs favorite clients lol. They all have to say buy to her
before we leave.
Her only real fault is that she doesn’t like to be bothered when she’s
asleep. She has NEVER bitten anyone but she will growl and get up and
go somewhere else. We’ve worked with her a lot and she’s much better
than she was when I got her. She adores children but because of this,
I don’t think she should go to a home with small children.
I got Shenzi when she was going to be put to sleep at the shelter. As for her prior history, I don’t know much. She was brought in as a stray and then adopted out almost 2 months later. A week later the people brought her back supposably because she chewed. They said they would put her in their garage when they left for work in the morning and left her there all day. One day she decided to chew up some of their dry wall and that was that, they brought her back. I assume the chewing was just separation anxiety. It was very obvious that this dog had never been a “house” dog. She had no “manners” of any kind. I was able to teach her basic commands, house break her and crate train her with ease. All she needed was some time and a second chance. And I’ve never had any kind of problem with her.
She’s in Menifee, CA. If you guys can help me get the word out about her, that would be fantastic.